Web News

Contraceptive app reportedly led to 37 unwanted pregnancies - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 5:00pm
Natural Cycles, designed to inform women when they can have unprotected sex, has been reported to a government agency in Sweden.
Categories: Web

Colorfield: React and Drupal 8 with JSON API 3/3

Web - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 4:31pm
React and Drupal 8 with JSON API 3/3 christophe Tue, 16/01/2018 - 22:31 This post focuses on translation issues and various pitfalls that you might encounter while building with React and Drupal: internationalization with and without language fallback, include images with images styles, taxonomy filter, fetch data on the route or the component, sort by weight, deploy in production.
Categories: Web

Watching live TV can be hard, Amazon wants to make it easier - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 4:04pm
Your Fire TV guide is getting some new live programming features. Alexa will take you straight to live TV.
Categories: Web

Apple gets 'The Office' actors to make its FileMaker exciting - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 3:39pm
Commentary: In an attempt to make its enterprise services memorable, Apple heads to the farm.
Categories: Web

Evolving Web: Drupal 8 Modules We ♥ for 2018

Web - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 2:00pm

With so many shiny new Drupal 8 modules emerging this year, we were hard pressed to pick our recommendations for 2018. It came down to asking ourselves: which modules are we excited about implementing in 2018… the ones that will make our projects better, faster, smarter brighter? Read on for our list of Drupal 8 modules we're excited about.

Configuration Split

The Drupal Configuration Split module makes Drupal 8 configuration management more customizable. This means you can set up some configurations that can be edited on the live site, without interfering with your configuration management workflow. Instead of importing and exporting the whole set of a site’s configuration, the module enables you to define sets of configuration to export to different directories that automatically merge again when they are imported.

Content Workflow

If you’ve shied away from implementing complicated workflows in the past, you’ll enjoy how the Content Workflow module makes it easy to set up a simple workflow. This core module enables you to streamline the content publication process by defining states for content (such as draft, unpublished and published) and then manage permissions around these states.

Deploy

The Deploy content staging module makes it easier to stage and preview content for a Drupal site. It’s often used to deploy content from one Drupal site to another. Redesigned for Drupal 8, the new version is based on the Multiversion and Replication modules, making it more efficient and flexible.

Drupal Commerce

The new full release of Drupal Commerce has us very excited to start building ecommerce sites in Drupal 8. Fully rebuilt for Drupal 8, the new Drupal Commerce module doesn’t presume a specific ecommerce business model, enabling developers to customize the module to suit a merchant’s needs.

JSON API

The JSON API module formats your JSON requests and responses to make them compliant with the JSON API Specification. This module is the key to setting up Drupal as a backend so you can implement the font-end with React or your front-end platform of choice.

Schema.org Metatag

Ramp up your SEO with structured data that helps Google categorize and display your pages. The Schema.org Metatag module allows you to add and validate Schema.org structured data as JASON LD, one of Google’s preferred data formats.

UI Patterns

If you’re looking for a way to implement an ‘atomic design’ in Drupal the Drupal UI Patterns project is a nice option. It consists of six modules that allow you to define and expose UI patterns as Drupal plugins. You can use them as drop-in templates for all entity types — paragraphs, views, field groups and more.

Webform

The Drupal webform module has a new release candidate for Drupal 8. A ton of work has been put into the module; it’s like a whole form-building application inside your Drupal site. Quickly integrate forms into any Drupal 8 website. enables you to build, publish and duplicate webforms. You can also manage and download submissions, and send confirmations to users.

Which Drupal 8 modules are doing it for you?

We’d love to hear about which Drupal 8 modules your team is excited about. Leave us a comment.

 

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web
Categories: Web

Star Wars cantina song really clicks on a Rubik's cube - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 1:16pm
A Rubik's cube master tackles the Star Wars Mos Eisley cantina theme while solving the colorful puzzle.
Categories: Web

This dashing dinosaur rocked a rainbow around its neck - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 1:00pm
Cool or creepy? Scientists describe the unusual appearance of a chicken-sized Jurassic dinosaur.
Categories: Web

We survived another CES: The best and weirdest things we saw (The 3:59, Ep. 339) - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:25pm
Another year, another CES down. We talk about our highlights and lowlights from the massive tech fest in Las Vegas.
Categories: Web

Google Doodle honors spirited, trailblazing actress Katy Jurado - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:24pm
Katy Jurado is recalled on what would have been her 94th birthday for her role in creating more opportunities for Latina actresses in Hollywood.
Categories: Web

BMW, Mercedes to test vehicle subscription services in the US - Roadshow

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:15pm
If the Germans have their way, we might be waving goodbye to buying or leasing.
Categories: Web

Get a Nonda Aiko rechargeable tracker for $16.99 - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 12:13pm
That's less than the cost of a Tile, and you don't have to replace it every year. Plus: a free $20 game and free two-year ShopRunner subscription!
Categories: Web

Body-heat-powered Matrix PowerWatch X now gets notifications - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 11:49am
Can thermal gradients start powering more advanced wearable things? We go hands-on at CES.
Categories: Web

Working with External User Researchers: Part I

A List Apart - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 10:00am

You’ve got an idea or perhaps some rough sketches, or you have a fully formed product nearing launch. Or maybe you’ve launched it already. Regardless of where you are in the product lifecycle, you know you need to get input from users.

You have a few sound options to get this input: use a full-time user researcher or contract out the work (or maybe a combination of both). Between the three of us, we’ve run a user research agency, hired external researchers, and worked as freelancers. Through our different perspectives, we hope to provide some helpful considerations.

Should you hire an external user researcher?

First things first–in this article, we focus on contracting external user researchers, meaning that a person or team is brought on for the duration of a contract to conduct the research. Here are the most common situations where we find this type of role:

Organizations without researchers on staff: It would be great if companies validated their work with users during every iteration. But unfortunately, in real-world projects, user research happens at less frequent intervals, meaning there might not be enough work to justify hiring a full-time researcher. For this reason, it sometimes makes sense to use external people as needed.

Organizations whose research staff is maxed out: In other cases, particularly with large companies, there may already be user researchers on the payroll. Sometimes these researchers are specific to a particular effort, and other times the researchers themselves function as internal consultants, helping out with research across multiple projects. Either way, there is a finite amount of research staff, and sometimes the staff gets overbooked. These companies may then pull in additional contract-based researchers to independently run particular projects or to provide support to full-time researchers.

Organizations that need special expertise: Even if a company does have user research on staff and those researchers have time, it’s possible that there are specialized kinds of user research for which an external contract-based researcher is brought on. For example, they may want to do research with representative users who regularly use screen readers, so they bring in an accessibility expert who also has user research skills. Or they might need a researcher with special quantitative skills for a certain project.

Why hire an external researcher vs. other options?

Designers as researchers: You could hire a full-time designer who also has research skills. But a designer usually won’t have the same level of research expertise as a dedicated researcher. Additionally, they may end up researching their own designs, making it extremely difficult to moderate test sessions without any form of bias.

Product managers as researchers: While it’s common for enthusiastic product managers to want to conduct their own guerilla user research, this is often a bad idea. Product managers tend to hear feedback that validates their ideas and most often aren’t trained on how to ask non-leading questions.

Temporary roles: You could also bring on a researcher in a staff augmentation role, meaning someone who works for you full-time for an extended period of time, but who is not considered a full-time employee. This can be a bit harder to justify. For example, there may be legal requirements that you’d have to pass if you directly contract an individual. Or you could find someone through a staffing agency–fewer legal hurdles, but likely far pricier.

If these options don’t sound like a good fit for your needs, hiring an external user researcher on a project-specific basis could be the best solution for you. They give you exactly what you need without additional commitment or other risks. They may be a freelancer (or a slightly larger microbusiness), or even a team farmed out for a particular project by a consulting firm or agency.

What kinds of projects would you contract a user researcher for?

You can reasonably expect that anyone or any company that advertises their skillset as user research likely can do the full scope of qualitative efforts—from usability studies of all kinds, to card sorts, to ethnographic and exploratory work.

Contracting out quantitative work is a bit riskier. An analogy that comes to mind is using TurboTax to file your taxes. While TurboTax may be just fine for many situations, it’s easy to overlook what you don’t know in terms of more complicated tax regulations, which can quickly get you in trouble. Similarly, with quantitative work, there’s a long list of diverse, specialized quantitative skills (e.g., logs analysis, conjoint, Kano, and multiple regression). Don’t assume someone advertising as a general quantitative user researcher has the exact skills you need.

Also, for some companies, quantitative work comes with unique user privacy considerations that can require special internal permissions from legal and privacy teams.

But if the topic of your project is pretty easy to grasp and absorb without needing much specialized technical or organizational insight, hiring an external researcher is generally a great option.

What are the benefits to hiring an external researcher?

A new, objective perspective is one major benefit to hiring an external researcher. We all suffer from design fixation and are influenced by organizational politics and perceived or real technical constraints. Hiring an unbiased external researcher can uncover more unexpected issues and opportunities.

Contracting a researcher can also expand an internal researcher’s ability to influence. Having someone else moderate research studies frees up in-house researchers to be part of the conversations among stakeholders that happen while user interviews are being observed. If they are intuitively aware of an issue or opportunity, they can emphasize their perspective during those critical, decision-making moments that they often miss out on when they moderate studies themselves. In these situations, the in-house team can even design the study plan, draft the discussion guide, and just have the contractor moderate the study. The external researcher may then collaborate with the in-house researcher on the final report.

More candid and honest feedback can come out of hiring an external researcher. Research participants tend to be more comfortable sharing more critical feedback with someone who doesn’t work for the company whose product is being tested.

Lastly, if you need access to specialized research equipment or software (for example, proprietary online research tools), it can be easier to get it via an external researcher.

How do I hire an external user researcher?

So you’ve decided that you need to bring on an external user researcher to your team. How do you get started?

Where to find them

Network: Don’t wait until you need help to start networking and collecting a list of external researchers. Be proactive. Go to UX events in your local region. You’ll meet consultants and freelancers at those events, as well as people who have contracted out research and can make recommendations. You won’t necessarily have the opportunity for deep conversations, but you can continue a discussion over coffee or drinks!

Referrals: Along those same lines, when you anticipate a need at some point in the future, seek out trusted UX colleagues at your company and elsewhere. Ask them to connect you with people that they may have worked with.

What about a request for proposal (RFP)?

Your company may require you to specify your need in the form of an RFP, which is a document that outlines your project needs and specifications, and asks for bids in response.

An RFP provides these benefits:

  • It keeps the playing field level, and anyone who wants to bid on a project can (in theory).
  • You can be very specific about what you’re looking for, and get bids that can be easy to compare on price.

On the other hand, an RFP comes with limitations:

  • You may think your requirements were very specific, but respondents may interpret them in different ways. This can result in large quote differences.
  • You may be eliminating smaller players—those freelancers and microbusinesses who may be able to give you the highest level of seniority for the dollar but don’t have the staff to respond to RFPs quickly.
  • You may be forced to be very concrete about your needs when you are not yet sure what you’ll actually need.

When it comes to RFPs, the most important thing to remember is to clearly and thoroughly specify your needs. Don’t forget to include small but important details that can matter in terms of pricing, such as answers to these questions:

  • Who is responsible for recruitment of research participants?
  • How many participants do you want included?
  • Who will be responsible for distributing participant incentives?
  • Who will be responsible for localizing prototypes?
  • How long will sessions be?
  • Over how many days and locations will they be?
  • What is the format of expected deliverables?
  • Do you want full, transcribed videos, or video clips?

It’s these details that will ultimately result in receiving informed proposals that are easy to compare.

Do a little digging on their backgrounds

Regardless of how you find a potential researcher, make sure you check out their credentials if you haven’t worked with them before.

At the corporate level, review the company: Google them and make sure that user research seems to be one of their core competencies. The same is true when dealing with a freelancer or microbusiness: Google them and see whether you get research-oriented results, and also check them out on social media.

Certainly feel free to ask for references if you don’t already have a direct connection, but take them with a grain of salt. Between the self-selecting nature of a reference, and a potential reference just trying to be nice to a friend, these can never be fully trusted.

One of the strongest indicators of experience and quality work is if a researcher has been hired by the same client for more than one project over time.

Larger agencies, individual researchers, or something in-between?

So you’ve got a solid sense of what research you need, and you’ve got several quality options to choose from. But external researchers come in all shapes and sizes, from single freelancers to very large agencies. How do you choose what’s best for your project while still evaluating the external researchers fairly?

Larger consulting firms and agencies do have some distinct advantages—namely that you’ve got a large company to back up the project. Even if one researcher isn’t available as expected (for example, if the project timeline slips), another can take their place. They also likely have a whole infrastructure for dealing with contracts like yours.

On the other hand, this larger infrastructure may add extra burden on your side. You may not know who exactly is going to be working on your project, or their level of seniority or experience. Changes in scope will likely be more involved. Larger infrastructure also likely means higher costs.

Individual (freelance) researchers also have some key advantages. You will likely have more control over contracting requirements. They are also likely to be more flexible—and less costly. In addition, if they were referred to you, you will be working with a specific resource that you can get to know over multiple projects.

Bringing on individual researchers can incur a little more risk. You will need to make sure that you can properly justify hiring an external researcher instead of an employee. (In the United States, the IRS has a variety of tests to make sure it is OK.) And if your project timeline slips, you run a greater risk of losing the researcher to some other commitment without someone to replace them.

A small business, a step between an individual researcher and a large firm, has some advantages over hiring an individual. Contracting an established business may involve less red tape, and you will still have the personal touch of knowing exactly who is conducting your research.

An established business also shows a certain level of commitment, even if it’s one person. For example, a microbusiness could represent a single freelancer, but it could also involve a very small number of employees or established relationships with trusted subcontractors (or both). Whatever the configuration,  don’t expect a business of this size to have the ability to readily respond to RFPs.

The money question

Whether you solicit RFPs or get a single bid, price quotes will often differ significantly. User research is not a product but rather a customized and sophisticated effort around your needs. Here are some important things to consider:

  • Price quotes are a reflection of how a project is interpreted. Different researchers are going to interpret your needs in different ways. A good price quote clearly details any assumptions that are going into pricing so you can quickly see if something is misaligned.
  • Research teams are made up of staff with different levels of experience. A quote is going to be a reflection of the overall seniority of the team, their salaries and benefits, the cost of any business resources they use, and a reasonable profit margin for the business.
  • Businesses all want to make a reasonable profit, but approaches to profitability differ. Some organizations may balance having a high volume of work with less profit per project. Other organizations may take more of a boutique approach: more selectivity over projects taken on, with added flexibility to focus on those projects, but also with a higher profit margin.
  • Overbooked businesses provide higher quotes. Some consultants and agencies are in the practice of rarely saying no to a request, even if they are at capacity in terms of their workload. In these instances, it can be a common practice to multiply a quote by as much as three—if you say no, no harm done given they’re at capacity. However, if you say yes, the substantial profit is worth the cost for them to hire additional resources and to work temporarily above capacity in the meantime.

To determine whether a researcher or research team is right for you, you’ll certainly need to look at the big picture, including pricing, associated assumptions, and the seniority and background of the individuals who are doing the work.

Remember, it’s always OK to negotiate

If you have a researcher or research team that you want to work with but their pricing isn’t in line with your budget, let them know. It could be that the quote is just based on faulty assumptions. They may expect you to negotiate and are willing to come down in price; they may also offer alternative, cheaper options with them.

Next steps

Hiring an external user researcher typically brings a long list of benefits. But like most relationships, you’ll need to invest time and effort to foster a healthy working dynamic between you, your external user researcher, and your team. Stay tuned for the next installment, where we’ll focus on how to collaborate together.

Categories: Web

Manifesto: Looking ahead to Drupalcamp London 2018

Web - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 9:44am
This year’s Drupalcamp London, a three-day knowledge-sharing conference devoted to all things Drupal, promises to be the biggest and best yet. Taking place at City University from 2nd to 4th March, it’s a must-visit event for anyone with more than a passing interest in the open-source CMS – developers, site builders, vendors, agencies and potential. Continue reading...
Categories: Web

Lyft grows gangbusters in 2017, bringing competition to Uber - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 9:00am
The US-based ride-hailing company gave 375.5 million rides in 2017, more than double the amount it gave a year earlier.
Categories: Web

This diamond-studded smartwatch costs nearly $200K - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:52am
TAG Heuer’s latest creation is the world’s most expensive smartwatch to date, but its tech is standard wearable fare.
Categories: Web

DrupalEasy: What "The Last Jedi" can teach us about learning Drupal

Web - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:38am

Spoiler alert! If you haven't seen “The Last Jedi” yet, this blog post includes what can be considered a minor spoiler. I've seen the movie a few times now (I saw the original Star Wars movie when I was 7 years old, and I've been hooked ever since), and I've been able to fully indoctrinate at least one of my kids in my love for the series. When we first saw the movie on opening night, there was a line of dialog that resonated with me more than usual - I've been thinking about that line for over a month now and have figured out how to relate my love of Star Wars with my obsession for teaching Drupal. 

"The Greatest Teacher, Failure Is"

There's a point in the movie when Yoda is speaking to another character and utters this line. As a former mechanical/aerospace engineering college adjunct professor and a current Drupal trainer, I've always believed that for a lesson to truly take hold, there has to be a little bit of pain - not physical pain, but rather the kind of pain that comes from doing something incorrectly (often numerous times) before realizing the proper way of doing something that leads to a more satisfying, correct (and often efficient) result. As usual, I didn't have the proper words to describe it - thanks to Yoda, I do now.

As I look back at my eleven years in the Drupal community, I can point to more things that I care to admit that I didn't do correctly the first time. If I narrow that list to technical mistakes, it becomes very clear that many of the mistakes I've made have had a direct impact on the curriculum I've written for our various training classes.

As we gear up to teach Mastering Professional Development Workflows with Pantheon for the second time, allow me to share some of the failures I've had in the past and how they've had a direct result on the curriculum for this 6-week class.

  1. "Everything is a content type" - this is something I learned only by repeatedly designing the information architecture for various sites that ended up not being able to completely fulfill all the project's requirements. Understanding the differences between various kinds of entities is key to building a sustainable site that meets 100% of a project's requirements.
  2. "Core search is fine" - I'm embarrassed to say how late I was to get on board the Search API train. Being able to provide faceted search to clients of all sizes is a huge win.
  3. "I don't need the command line" - looking back at the first half-ish of my Drupal career, I used Drush only when absolutely necessary. Not learning basic command line tools until well into Drupal 7 definitely held me back. With Drupal 8, if you want to be a professional Drupal developer, there is no way to avoid it. Luckily, using command line tools like Composer, Drush, and Drupal Console are not only "the right thing to do", but also save time. 
  4. "MAMP is fine" - I was late to the party in moving my local development environment from MAMP and Acquia Dev Desktop to a Docker-based solution. I had played around a bit with virtualized solutions, but once you get accustomed to a professional-grade, modern, Docker-based solution, you'll never go back.

While I could list additional examples (multi-branch development, configuration management, display modes) of previous failures - or even one or two that I feel like I'm currently failing (test-driven development), the point is that sometimes it is necessary to fail in order to really understand the value of a success. 

DrupalEasy's 6-week live, online Mastering Professional Development Workflows with Pantheon, not coincidentally, addresses the failures listed above. The next session begins on February 27, 2018.  

The next session (our 11th!) of our 12-week, live, online more-introductory-focused Drupal Career Online begins March 26, 2018.
 

Categories: Web

Most Americans say social media is making the news worse - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:33am
A survey reveals that the majority of Americans polled aren't happy with the impact of social media on the news.
Categories: Web

Tesla, Apple aren't self-driving leaders, study argues - Roadshow

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:13am
The 2018 Navigant Autonomous Driving Leaderboard shows a major gap between public perception and capability when it comes to autonomous-drive research.
Categories: Web

In 2018, voice assistants will make the leap out of your home - CNET

Webware - Tue, 01/16/2018 - 8:00am
Alexa and Google Assistant want to be on the go with you, plugging into smart glasses, smart earbuds and even smart toilets.
Categories: Web

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